Search Our Catalog

Civil War Identified Swords -

Presentation Sword Of Colonel Rufus P. Tapley, 27th Maine Inf. - Exquisite Ames Presentation Grade
Item #: PSC250
Presentation Sword Of Colonel Rufus P. Tapley, 27th Maine Inf. - Exquisite Ames Presentation Grade Presentation Sword Of Colonel Rufus P. Tapley, 27th Maine Inf. - Exquisite Ames Presentation Grade Presentation Sword Of Colonel Rufus P. Tapley, 27th Maine Inf. - Exquisite Ames Presentation Grade Presentation Sword Of Colonel Rufus P. Tapley, 27th Maine Inf. - Exquisite Ames Presentation Grade Presentation Sword Of Colonel Rufus P. Tapley, 27th Maine Inf. - Exquisite Ames Presentation Grade Presentation Sword Of Colonel Rufus P. Tapley, 27th Maine Inf. - Exquisite Ames Presentation Grade Presentation Sword Of Colonel Rufus P. Tapley, 27th Maine Inf. - Exquisite Ames Presentation Grade Presentation Sword Of Colonel Rufus P. Tapley, 27th Maine Inf. - Exquisite Ames Presentation Grade Presentation Sword Of Colonel Rufus P. Tapley, 27th Maine Inf. - Exquisite Ames Presentation Grade
Click on an image to enlarge

The Ames Model 1850 Foot Officer sword is a classic weapon of the Civil War era. Introduced (by Ames) as the regulation sword for lieutenants and captains in 1850, it underwent some modifications by the start of the Civil War. These changes were mostly associated with a reduction in the heft and weight of the blade. The 1850 Foot Officer sword, and its counterpart for higher ranking officers - the 1850 Staff & Field, were well received by officers. Almost immediately after their introduction, higher grade variations were developed for militia officers and for presentations. These variations vary broadly respective to scabbard configurations, blade etching patterns, and hilt engravings. An attractive and sought after scabbard variation of these higher grade Ames products is the brass sheath with gilt finish and engraved elements.

The sword presented here incorporates such a scabbard. The inscription reads "Presented to Col. Rufus P. Tapley, 27th Regt. Me. Vols., by his friends in Saco, Oct. 18.1862." The inscription is beautifully done and in period style. The friends of Colonel Tapley that presented the sword, probably had limited information on sword regulations for officers. By rank, Tapley should have been presented a Staff & Field sword. Though given a Foot Officer sword, one Staff & Field concessionary element was developed by engraving the oak leaf pattern on the ring mounts.

Inserted within the scabbard is a standard grade Foot Officer sword, with one presentation grade element - a brass plug inserted above the tang in the pommel (often missing in higher grade swords). The ricasso is etched "Ames Mfg. Co., Chicopee, Mass." The brass scabbard is also stamped with the "Ames" address. The original washer, throat, mounts, and screws are all original to the sword and untouched.

The condition of this sword and scabbard is exquisite, and truly falls within the category of mint. The gilt on the guard, pommel and scabbard is nearly 100% present. The blade etching is without flaw, and the polished areas are factory bright.

Rufus P. Tapley

Residence Saco ME; 
Enlisted on 9/19/1862 as a Colonel.

On 9/19/1862 he was commissioned into Field & Staff ME 27th Infantry 
He was discharged on 1/23/1863


Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:

 - Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Maine
(c) Historical Data Systems, Inc. @ www.civilwardata.com


TWENTY-SEVENTH MAINE INFANTRY
(Nine Months)
     Twenty-seventh Infantry.--Cols., Rufus P. Tapley, Mark F. 
Wentworth; Lieut.-Cols., Mark F. Wentworth, James M. Stone; 
Majs., James M. Stone, John D. Hill.  Most of the members of 
this regiment came from York county and were rendezvoused at 
Portland, where the regiment was mustered into service Sept. 
30, 1862, to serve for nine months.  They left on Oct. 20 for 
Washington, arriving there on the 22nd.  On the 26th it marched 
to Arlington Heights, where it remained doing picket duty until 
Dec. 12th, when it was ordered to the south of Hunting creek.  
Here it relieved a Vermont brigade in the duty of guarding a 
picket line 8 miles long, extending from the Potomac near Mount 
Vernon to the Orange & Alexandria railroad, and remained here 
in the performance of that duty throughout a severe winter 
until March 24, 1863.  It then moved to Chantilly, Va., doing 
picket duty on the outermost line of infantry in the defenses 
of Washington.  On June 25 it returned to Arlington Heights.  
The term of service of the regiment had already expired, but 
315 of the officers and men volunteered to remain and if 
necessary assist in the defense of the capital against the 
forces of Gen. Lee, who had then commenced his great invasion 
of Pennsylvania.  On July 4, after the result of the battle of 
Gettysburg was announced, the regiment left for Maine and 
arrived at Portland on the 6th, where the men were mustered out 
on the 17th.  The 27th left the state with 949 men, and lost 82 
men by death, discharge and resignation.

(Sold)

The Pennsylvania Sword Collectors LLC are not responsible for any injuries due to the antique weapons sold on this website. We believe that any items sold are for collectible purposes only and not to be used otherwise. Examples: antique firearms should not be fired and sharp swords should be handled with care.